AWS – Making AWS FSx for Windows Highly Available through Multi AZ Resilience – Part 7: Costs and Considerations

Now that we have demonstrated fully implementing a highly available multi AZ FSx for Windows solution, this section will briefly review some of the costs that FSx can incur and also some considerations that should be kept in mind while implementing this solution in a production system.

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AWS – Making AWS FSx for Windows Highly Available through Multi AZ Resilience – Part 6: Testing Multi AZ FSx for Windows High Availability

To check our namespace will still be available if we were to lose one of our namespace servers, we are going to simulate a failure of the one of the namespace servers and then also remove connectivity to our primary subnet containing a FSx filesystem and a namespace server (this is the subnet in AZ B). This loss of connectivity should have no impact on accessing our files, and also, once restored, should replicate any changes while it was offline.

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AWS – Making AWS FSx for Windows Highly Available through Multi AZ Resilience – Part 5: Configure Namespace for Multi AZ FSx for Windows

As replication is now setup and working, we need to configure a namespace path for our users to use. This will allow end users to use a single UNC path and automatically be directed to whichever copy of the filesystem is available and failover to the other automatically without intervention.

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AWS – Making AWS FSx for Windows Highly Available through Multi AZ Resilience – Part 4: Configuring FSx for Windows Cross AZ Replication

As we are now able to access both the FSx filesystems individually from the client machine, the next stage is to configure replication between them in order to ensure that data is kept in-sync across both. Microsoft DFS-R implemented on the managed FSx filesystems will deal with the replication once its setup and configured.

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AWS – Making AWS FSx for Windows Highly Available through Multi AZ Resilience – Part 3: Configure AWS FSx for Windows using a Self-Managed Active Directory

In this section, we will setup and configure FSx for Windows filesystems in multiple availability zones within AWS’s infrastructure. These FSx filesystems are fully managed by AWS, all OS updates and maintenance tasks of the instances are dealt with by AWS with no end user intervention needed.

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